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to everybody. john, stocks racing, but the economy stalling? >> yes. that is exactly the point. look, you said the stocks are on fire. they have been on fire. there is obviously a disconnect. the economy, you can not say, no one will say the last three years has been on fire. with the fed pumping money, with zero interest rates, the rich get richer, the poor get poor. we have the highest poverty rate -- more people in poverty in the history of our country. we're seeing the market take off. there is a huge disconnect between the two and that's not going to change with the lowest labor force participation rate, consumer driving 70% of the economy. >> susan, there are some good things out there, right? the housing market has found its foundation. we did have a solid jobs report and we had high revisions for the last couple of months. so is main street feeling this, too, or is it all wall street? >> no, it's starting to get better. people have been eulogizing this economy for months and it's just not as bad -- >> that's a big word. [ laughter ] >> and it's just not as bad as people are saying it i
it's not a real magic secret here. if the growth rate of the economy is going to be only a little above 2%, the unemployment rate is not going to come down very fast. we are just not going to generate this type of job growth or faster than this on a sustained basis and that's what we need to do. >> are we stuck here with a jobless rate that ticking down sometimes but not falling? >> so we've taken a big step towards a better outcome. i'm encouraged by friday's jobs report. we created jobs, unemployment is coming down for the right reasons. this is an important step. it's not the whole thing. we still have the head winds coming from washington. we still have slow growth, but it tells me that the underlying economy continues to heal and that's good news. i wish it were healing quicker, but it's definitely healing. >> i see a lot of retail jobs here, leisure and hospitality. i think it's great consumers feel confident enough to go to the mall or the strip mall. note many of those jobs will pay enough and put a kid through college. what is the quality of jobs? >> when you start coming
on the risks to the global economy. what britain's former prime minister says is europe's biggest problem. and what it means on this side of the pond. >>> plus, diamonds are a business's best friend. i'll talk to the ceo of the largest online jewelry retailer about confidence, customization and the competition's prices. "on the money" begins right now. >> announcer: this is america's number one financial news program, "on the money." now maria bartiromo. >> here's a look at what's making news as we head into a new week. the stock market touching new highs. the dow jones industrial average broke past the record, 15,000 mark, for the first time ever on friday. also recorded highs for the s&p and the nasdaq composite. investors were moved by better than expected monthly jobs report. the unemployment rate stands at 7.5% in the united states. that is the lowest number since december of 2008. and a total of 165,000 new jobs were created in the month of april. that was better than expectations. the federal reserve will continue purchasing $85 billion a month meanwhile of treasury securities and
we live in one america with to economies. i am christine romans. this is your money. the stock market is litting highs, corporate profits are soaring and not everyone is feeling it. as the dow moved higher, america's middle class is stuck. you should be rolling in stock market riches. instead, many of you are missing out. only 52% of ruin vested in stocks. that's down from 65% in 2007. meanwhile, corporate profits are soaring, up 94% as a share of the economy in the last decade. wages are stagnant. america's companies are so hungry for talent they're importing it from abroad. meanwhile, you can't pay for the college degree you need just to compete. i want to bring in terry savage, steven moore and naomi prin. steve sen a senior economic writer and conservative commentator and noem i a senior fellow at demos is. she is also the author of it takes a pillage, an epic tale of power, deceit and untold trillions. terri, let me start with you, the stock market is disconnected, the s&p 500 up 120% since the lows of 2009 and a new forecast guidance this week says it is not done yet. the
's not a real magic secret here, if the growth rate of the economy is going to be only a little above 2%, the unemployment rate is not going to come down very fast. we're not going to generate this kind of job growth faster than this on a sustained basis and that's what we need to do. >> mohammed, are we stuck here, mohamed el erian with a jobless rate ticking down sometimes but not falling? >> so we've taken a big step towards a better outcome. i'm actually quite encouraged by friday's jobs report. if you look at the last three months we've created 212,000 jobs, long-term unemployment is coming down, like you said the unemployment rate is coming down for the right reasons. so this is an important step. it's not the whole thing, and we still have the head winds coming from washington, we still have slow growth but it tells me that the underlying economy continues to heal, and that's good news. i wish it were healing quicker, but it's definitely healing. >> austan, let me ask you about the quality of the jobs coming back. i see retail jobs and leisure and hospitality, it's great consumer
in the regional economy and again there is so much business activity. and we are blessed with just being in this part of the country and the world. i'm very interested in what we are going to hear from our speakers this morning to sort off guide us through this year. now before we get to our program please join me in thanking the organizations and people who made this possible. and you can clap now for awful them but -- this event is jointly presented by san francisco business times and our partner, title sponsor corn irand carey commercial new mark, night, frank. and we are going it hear from dan clef man and dan class man some 14 year ago really came up with this idea, we sat down over lunch and there was another person involved allen cline knelt and which came up with this idea and so i have to give dan much much credit for that. (applause). . very much so. and in 2012, cornish and carey, dominated the area of commercial real estate with over $6 billion in leasing and sales transactions so very good there. and you are soon going to hear from dan and he is going to give us that a go
unable to find one. >> we have to get this economy going, and not raising tax rates to have more peopl working we could do would it not for the drag of the president's health care law. >> their use in the jobs report to sage to and the sequester cuts and the president spoke of more government spending on both sides of the border. >> with remember every dollar that we invest in research and development concerns such march are economy with jobs and opportunity and products. >> a soft spot for the president is used and a planet with the new jobs report showing the effect of an employee rate for young people if you include those looking for work that has given up a 16% the highest level since world war two. >> are generation is graduating college with this desire and passion to make a difference coming into an economy was stagnant with no limit -- new jobs in their the opportunity. >> the rnc chairman criticized the media and the president for not bringing up the jobs at the a news conference on tuesday although officials say in the weeks ahead the president will be traveling around the u.
in circulation. he says it's aimed at pulling japan's economy out of deplace and not weakening the yen. >> translator: we are coming to acknowledge that each country does various things for the sake of its own economy. >> g-7 leaders have been watching the yen lose strength against the dollar and are checking to make sure japan is following the rules. >>> u.s. secretary jack lu gave his thoughts. he said he will keep an eye on whether they stick to g-7 and g-20 agreements. >>> german finance minister also weighed in on exchange rates. he said the leaders of all g-20 nations must observe their akweemt not to manipulate rates for competitive advantage. >>> japanese leaders are looking to boost their economy by helping companies make inroads in africa. they want to negotiate agreements with guan na, kenya and mozambique. analysts say japanese ministers will likely strike their first deal with the immediate leaders of mozambique. that country is rich in natural resores such as coal and gas. >>> members of the abe administration have set out their the position on an issue that's put them un
was better than expect. hit the president for not mentioning jobs and the economy in his news press conference last tuesday which was dominated by national security issues. jay carney earlier today saying, look, the president realized that while this was a decent jobs report he needs to talk up the economy and jobs a bit more. >> we're in a situation now where, on friday, we had another month of private sector job creation. we had numbers that exceeded some expectations but by no means were what we need in the end to get where we want to go, which is where the president always said. as long is a there's one looking for a job and can't get one, he will keep working. >> now, the republicans already offering sort of a prebuttal to the president's road show that starts in texas on tuesday. speaker john boehner's office saying the road trip could be a great at any time for the president to acknowledge his policies are stifling growth and it's time to unleash our economic -- growth. and here's the other thing if you look at what is going on. the the president is hitting the road because w
.s. recovery at risk if the sequester stays in place? or can the u.s. economy absorb all this? diane is the chief economist for mesro financial. diane, let me start with you. the jobs report friday, 165,000 jobs created. unemployment rate 7.5%. did you see evidence of the sequester jobs report? >> very little evidence. the part we started to see was federal jobs did outpace the loss in state and local jobs and that's completely the reverse of what we saw last year, so now you're seeing the federal government become the headwind as the state and local government cuts. that's bad news that we're losing federal jobs in terms of overall jobs number. and the sequester, it cascades over time. it's not something -- the sky is falling is not how the sequester worked. we'll see these effects multiply as we move into these next couple months. >> we're starting to see these one after another. we talked about head start, meals on wheels, faa, the flight delays. but here's what liberals say. liberals say that budget cuts and this newfound budget religion is just a way for conservatives to gut the
. it is hosted by tavis smiley. join us sunday at 10:30 a.m. eastern here on c-span. >> the u.s. economy created 165,000 in april and push the unemployment rate since late 2008. hear us to discuss the latest job numbers is ylan mui. tell us about the direction you saw from washington and wall street on these numbers. are they about what folks were expecting westmark -- were expecting? guest: it was better than what people were expecting. 88,000 jobs created in the month of march. that is nowhere near the level we need in order to see the recovery take off. host: the numbers that we sought yesterday really were a sign that the recovery is tugging along. .t is still going along it does not at the level we would like to see that yet. the labor department also revived the figures for the previous two months. that is just as important for the increase in april. in the month of march, 88,000 that many people were worried about is now 130,000. significantly higher. the recovery is plugging along. host: here is a blog post yesterday. blog post from alan krueger, the chairman of the white house council o
, to drag the nation's attention back to the arena to jobs and economy despite the best effort of our collective attention to wander on grandstanding of the benghazi attacks and salacious murder trials. >> i have talked about what we can do to reignite the true engine of america's economic growth. a thriving rising middle class and a dynamic cutting edge economy. that's our priority. that should be washington's top priority, when you're talking to your members of congress or talking to elected officials. you've got to remind them we don't want government to do everything for us but it's got a role to play on infrastructure, basic research, making sure that we've got a tax system that's fair. making sure that we've got some basic stability in our budget so people aren't always guessing what's going to happen around the corner. >> the president was met at the airport today by texas governor rick perry. the two former mitt romney opponents, one vanquished, one victorious, seemed to have an affable enough greeting especially that time when he met jan brewer visiting arizona last year. bot
the purchasing power to go and keep the economy going. you cannot have a strong economy without a strong and growing middle class. tavis: i am not naive been asking this question, but louis brandeis once said you can either have the will concentrate in the hands of a few, or you can have democracy, but you cannot have both. that is becoming more and more, to your point, the way the country is run, the way the deck is stacked, and yet there is not a lot of conversation about it, what is it going to take for us to have a real conversation about income inequality, could you cannot sustain a democracy this way long term? >> you also cannot sustain an economy long term. even the rich would do better with a smaller share of a rapidly growing economy in a society that was not as divisive as we are now, than they are now with the very large share of an economy that is barely growing because the middle class doesn't have that purchasing power, and it is increasingly divided. thatit takes, the parallel is most revealing is 1901 when we had, again, a wide divide between rich and poor prevent corrup
economy, great stock, but i don't see much in the way of appreciation in the short run for microsoft. - the dollar is above the yen for the first time in four years. what do you make of that? - you know, i think it is going to continue. the greenback here had hit some lows. it is on its rally back, and i really think that it is going to continue and just get stronger. - well scott, it's not take your kids to work day, but we wanted to show your son and his friend on the air. we have some family values here on the show, and they are great looking kids, and i'm sure they're smart as well. - thank you very much angie. they are very happy to hear that. it's been a big week for banks. against the backdrop of angry protesters, bank of america's ceo brian moynihan told shareholders in charlotte, north carolina, the bank has turned a corner and is on the path to higher earnings. a few dozen demonstrators showed up outside the meeting. "bank of america funds coal to $3 billion a year, and i needed to speak out." "i'm hopeful, because there were so many speaking eloquently about the issue, tha
to rebuild their national finances while spending more to stimulate their economies. the finance ministers and central bank governors are talking near london. they guide economies that are recovering but slowly. analysts say they'll discuss how to nurse their government finances back to health while spending more to generate growth. most g7 leaders are key to spend. the germans are standing firm in their belief for a need of austerity. japan's finance minister and bank of japan governor explain why they have been putting more money into circulation. the japanese say their only goal is to pull their economy out of deflation. the dollar surged past 101 yen. it reached its highest level in over four years. u.s. treasury secretary jack lew gave american tv viewers his take on the japanese policy. he said he accepts what the japanese leaders are doing as long as they're not devaluing the yen deliberately. he said he'll keep an eye on whether the japanese stick to rules agreed by the leaders of the g7 and g20. and the german finance minister sent a similar message. he said the leader of all g20
'm on the warpath of the current budget. full employment, gdp, we hope the economy springs back or that is what it is about. you stay on the path of potential gdp forever. it hasn't happened in the last 13 years. why are we using models like this that results in a projection. and i don't see how it will get any better. when you do that, we have this area and i'm not trying to make it worse. >> okay. [inaudible question] it has never happened in human history. >> yes, we think the economy is going to grow at 3% on average. >> we had 1.7% since the first quarter of 2000. there was 3.9 that is nominal. this is also what we had last three years. it is pretty ugly. >> thank you. >> okay. i saw yesterday. you read the op-ed and then i heard this. >> it is an attempt to be entrusted with the public dialogue. things about the reagan era that republicans believe -- things about the new dl. there was an accidental massive stimulus they didn't realize all the veterans in the nearly 3 million never see them are so desperate. they thought that they would be over 10 years. it was the equivalent of a 1 trill
the training they need to ac sell in today's economy -- excel in today's economy. giving more flexibility to the pell grant program would help ensure success for hardworking students simply looking to get ahead. thank you, mr. speaker, and i do yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from illinois. or what purpose do you rise? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in recognition of national nurses week and to support one of the most important nurses i know, my wife, shannon. shannon is a mother to our three children and has been a nurse for 18 years. she now teaches our next generation of nurses in springfield, illinois, at st. john's college. it's important for to us recognize the more than 3.1 million nurses across this great country. mr. davis: they are truly the backbone of our nation's hospitals, clinics and doctors offices. i know firsthand that nurses work every day to ensure that their patients are receiving the quality care they need and de
't think this is a surprise to anybody in europe. and definitely we see the difficult economy in southern europe, france, italy, spain, really suffer. >>> and the world's biggest steel maker issues a more optimistic outlook than competitors after beating expectationings from q1 core earnings. >>> okay. industrial output out for italy. it was down minus 0.8% month on month. reuters forecast was minus 0.2. we also had better than expected uk industrial production out as well. plan to focus as well as the euro/dollar the focus on the yen, euro/yen hit a 3 1/2 month high, and dollar/yen with a high. we've gone up to 101.20. we've had such a problem scaling through. so it is a new high. the next target we're talking about 101.45, a level we haven't seen since october 2008. the japanese currency slumping during trade after greenback strengthened on the back of upbeat jobless forecast. the yen has fallen 17% against the greenback this year. joining us is steve wang research director at reorient financial markets. welcome to you both. is this n your mind, a decisive break above 100? can we hold?
>>. >>> cuts of this size made this quickly, can lose jobs and slow the growth of the economy. >> sequestration is going to get worse. >> there is only one way to truly fix the sequester and that is replacing it before it causes further damage. >> neil: so much for further damage. i'm neil cavuto. on top of the economy, apparently laughing in the face of all that sequestration devastation. those $85 billion in automatic spending cuts, not cutting into the job market, not by a long shot. 165,000 jobs were added in april. get this -- the two prior months were revised to show hundred thousand more americans working than originally report. so what to make of that sequestration once again. especially since we didn't see any of it at all. to our panel. charles payne, what do you think. >> it's about time, first before we start. someone in washington needs to start reminding americans how great this country is. every time i see this, 80 pound weak link we are an amazing country. last thing that is going to hurt us is having the government having some sort of fiscal restraint. what is
and get their views on what the future holds for the country's biggest economies. and find out what i was told about the social emergency at 10:40 cet. and it's been voted one of the top 100 ipads apps and one of three travel apps you should never leave town without. we'll speak to the co-founder of hotel tonight and find out what the san francisco based company's plans are. plus, sales look flat for the big global brewers. find out how smaller competitors are getting crafty. who writes this stuff? plus, we've got upbeat trade data from the world's second biggest economy. china's exports beat forecasts by a wide margin up 14.7% in april from a year ago. economists were looking for a rise around 10%. imports were also higher than expected up nearly 17%. that's helped china return to a trade surplus in april after an unexpected deficit in march. many analysts are skeptical of the data. exports have been overinflate ing invoices. thanks for joining us. how much do we question this data because the exports to hong kong and taiwan do look overly strong. >> that's right. the exports to the
a massive keynesian state, as i call it, dedicated to stimulating and boosting and propping the economy. as a result of that, we have a $1 trillion deficit, both sides are dug in, everybody knows this cannot last. it is dangerous rolling down the road, and yet, the system has a serious inability to make compromises, to find packages that you can assemble a governing majority, so it was 1981limited scope issue in to 1985 when i was there, but at large, the lesson from that time is what the clear and present danger is today. our fiscal process is paralyzed, dysfunctional, broken, and that is what i call the budget a doomsday machine, something that is going to roll on, and no one can seem to stop it. >> 34 years old though. director. is there a personal residual, where some still do not like you because of what happened? >> i am sure there are, because it is the one got -- one job in government -- there is no other place in our government where the buck stops, where choices priorities set. the agencies are advocates. the congressional process is divided into dozens and dozens who often be
they say about the state of the economy. >> woodruff: the c.d.c. reports more people in the u.s. die from suicide than car accidents. ray suarez looks at this worrisome rise in rates, particularly among baby boomers. >> brown: paul solman reports on the plight of older workers struggling to find employment even as the job numbers improve. >> i have 30 years of experience and you'll see something that says "we want you to have x amount of skills but we only want you to have no more than two years of experience." >> woodruff: the analysis of mark shields and michael gerson, sitting in for david brooks. >> brown: and we close with a book conversation with author michael pollan about the loss of good old-fashioned home cookin'. >> people have very strong feelings about cooking. we all have memories of being in the kitchen when our mom was preparing a meal or our grandmother so i don't think we're quite ready to let it go. i think that's one of the reasons we're obsessing about it. the mystery is why don't we do it. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the
once again, to his credit, to drag the nation's attention back to the arena of jobs and the economy, despite the best efforts of our collective attention to grandstanding and conspiracy theorizing on the benghazi attacks or salacious murder trials. >> i have spent the day in austin talking about what we can do to reignite the true engine of america's economic growth. a thriving, rising, middle class and dynamic cutting-edge economy. that's our priority. that should be washington's top priority when you are talking to your members of congress, when you are talking to elected officials. you have to remind them, we don't want government to do everything for us but it has a role to play on infrastructure, basic research, making sure we have a tax system that's fair. making sure that we have some basic snablt our budget so people aren't always guessing what's going to happen around the corner. >>> president was met at the airport by texas governor perry. the two former mitt romney opponents seem to have an aable enough greeting especially after he was met on the tarmac last year. cordial
should be restoreing check growth. the last four years our economy has grown an average of 0.9% a year. i think it makes no sense whatsoever at a time of struggling economic growth for the united states senate to be passing a massive new internet sales tax, extending $23 billion in sales taxes to small businesses, selling online all over the country. i think it will kill jobs. it will hurt small businesses. it will impose massive compliance costs. it will, in particular, hurt the little guy. that's why i voted against it. that's why i hope the house votes this bill down. >> you know, supporters of this bill have argued it's going to somehow level the playing field. can i just focus a moment on your point about sll business? >> sure. >> won't they have to have unbelievable compliance costs for 9,500, close to 10,000 sales tax jurisdiction, which the big boys don't have to have? i mean, is this really a level playing field or is there something else going on here? >> larry, you are exactly right. imagine you are a small back, single mom, a hispanic business other than, you are selling onlin
report. so the economy healthier than many think? >> and tonight we'll met the man who solved the riddle of how to take a simple idea and turn it into a very successful business. all that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for friday, may 3rd. >>> good evening, everyone. susie, stocks soared at the outset and kept on going pretty much right up until the close. a perfect day for you to be at one of the biggest investor events of the year. >> you're absolutely right, tyler. good evening, everyone. i'm here in omaha forewa forewarn warren buffett's shareholder meeting, and tomorrow's markets. stocks powered, the dow and s&p 500 to record highs on positive news about the labor market. for the first time ever, the dow traded above 15,000, and the s&p closed above 1600. and for the s&p, this was a long-time coming. the index first closed above 1500 in march of 2000. so it took 13 years for the benchmark to crack this new psychologically important level. and here are the numbers. the dow surged 142 points today. but closed just below the 15,000 mark. the nasdaq jumped 38. the s&p ros
, being europe's largest economy. so very, very closely watch this particular one. 49.2 in april, which is slightly worse than spec'd. we were looking for a figure above 50, above that level that separates contraction from expansion. but the eurozone business downturn, though, is pointing according to many analyst toes a continued recession taking place in the second quarter, given that we still are in this contraction level. regardless of whether the number is slightly better or not, it's still below 50. steve jacobson is a chief economist at saxo bank and he's with us for the top of the show for the first half hour. good to see you. we're looking at potentially a deeper recession in the second quarter for the eurozone. i guess we're here to stay for the time being. >> so unfortunately no change. and i think the whole discussion about easing up on the austerity only makes the business people more confused. just about the time that we were going to see some sort of structural reforms going on, which we've seen slightly as the data indicates this morning in italy, and now they're going t
, but beat the fish. this is part of our natural resource-based economy where our air and our water are an incredibly important resource. so, chair boxer, thank you for your leadership on this. we as a cynic, as the body are failing to meet our responsibilities of advising -- advice and consent. that failure is unacceptable and, therefore, we need to have that conversation among our members about how we're going to change how the senate works. because the courtesy that has been extended has now become a courtesy abuse that is a complete dereliction of responsibility and an unacceptable attack on other branches of the government. so i look forward to working with the chair and my colleagues as we take on this very important issue so that the senate, once considered a great deliberative body, can at least become a functioning audie. thank you, madam chair. >> thank you, senator, for all your leadership and i want to thank my democratic colleagues are being you. let the record show that senator gillibrand had to leave in order to go to the white house for a meeting on another very impo
at california's disability system it is a disaster and the economy as it stands right now is incentive enough for employees to perform well on the job. you don't want to lose your job right now. i don't think we need another law to step in the way. >> up next. lotless of controversy about the 15 year old buying the morning after pill. but there is something more controversial. let the private market who can and cannot buy that. and everything else. it is it a heated debate coming up next. at 1:00 p.m. eastern. keep it here back to forbes on fox. >> a huge battle erupting over who should be able to buy the so-call would morning after pill. if you are 15 or older, you can buy it over the counter. this debate highlights that we have too many branches of government running our livings. john, you think the government should get out altogether. >> this is disturbing to parentings. but that doesn't mean the federal government should expert itself-. it is not serving as a nanny to us. it doesn't take a village to raise kids. it is something to be left to parents. >> when it come to 15 year omed it is
. >> yeah, okay. what is the true picture as far as you're concerned in the chinese economy right now? >> well, i guess on the trade fund, we actually saw the data so far and we're down on the average either way. they're in ae are very tight position. i don't envy the policy of the chinese policymaker at the moment because this global search for yield has sent liquidity out discusseding back into china. one of the representans of that is to push up the em minimumby and exacerbate this on chinese prices. having a deflationary on product prices as we see in the ppi an separation of acceleration. probably weaker growth to come from that aspect. on the other hand, because of the search for yields and because of the inflows adding excessive liquidity, we're seeing property prices and asset prices picking up in china, overheating and potentially the blowing of bubbles n bond market. >> steven, the fact that we've got the stock market rally but actually no move in commodities, tell us what will investors think about chinese growth at the moment. >> we're trying to ask ourselves why the stock
or harsh sulfates. for naturally clear skin. >>> coming up, signs of improvement in the economy as the unemployment rate dips to improvement in the economy as the ulook, every day we're using more and more energy. the world needs more energy. where's it going to come from? ♪ that's why right here, in australia, chevron is building one of the biggest natural gas projects in the world. enough power for a city the size of singapore for 50 years. what's it going to do to the planet? natural gas is the cleanest conventional fuel there is. we've got to be smart about this. it's a smart way to go. ♪ >>> more on the theme we were just talking about. approval of president obama's handling of terror threats. he's still pretty strong at 56%. 35% disapproval as more of these issues mount for him. back with our political round table. former speaker of the house and presidential candidate newt gingrich. former democratic congressman from tennessee, harold ford jr. editor of the national review rich lowry. managing editor of the grio.com and msnbc contributor joy reid. a lot to pick up on.
, signs of improvement in the economy as the unemployment rate dips to improvement in the economy as the ulook, every day we're using more and more energy. the world needs more energy. where's it going to come from? ♪ that's why right here, in australia, chevron is building one of the biggest natural gas projects in the world. enough power for a city the size of singapore for 50 years. what's it going to do to the planet? natural gas is the cleanest conventional fuel there is. we've got to be smart about this. it's a smart way to go. ♪ [ agent smith ] i've found software that intrigues me. it appears it's an agent of good. ge has wired their medical hardware with innovative software to be in many places at the same time. using data to connect patients to software, to nurses to the right people and machines. ♪ helping hospitals treat people even better, while dramatically reducing waiting time. now a waiting room is just a room. [ telephone ringing ] [ static warbles ] [ beeping ] red or blue? ♪ >>> more on the theme we were just talking about. approval of president obama's
.s. economy is going to be okay. the u.s. rally came in reaction to strong stock performance in world markets this morning and we'll have more on that in just a moment. first, here's a look at the closing digits on wall street and closing at a record 15,056. the nasdaq added three and the s&p gained eight points to 1625 and its highest points ever. >> the historic highs reached in u.s. equities had helped jump-start a global rebound in stocks with burrses from asia to europe and beyond making record-set being gains. lisa has more now from london. >> hi, everyone. it's pretty amazing what's going on on global equity markets at the moment. we're seeing a lot of buying into u.s. stocks, as you know. we are also seeing a lot of buying into asian stocks. so you are looking here at asian stock markets are very, very green especially today and we saw new five-year highs being hit in japan on the nikkei and their main index there. this despite the fact that we're seeing soft economic data reports. the japanese market players also coming back from a four-day weekend. so you have to bring that into acc
like to talk with the always-outspoken coffee boss about the state of business, the economy, jobs, and a lot more. that's coming up in the next hour. >> also here exclusively, very exciting, duke basketball coaching legend mike kruszewski. they asked coach k. to speak there after he gives his presentation, he will be here on "closing bell." you don't want to miss that. >> i love talking to coach k. about leadership. >> that's his thing. >> we'll talk with him. the dow jones industrial average, off of the highs of the day, but nonetheless, none chartered waters here. nasdaq looks like this. gains there as well. although it, too, off of the best levels, showing a gain here of about seven points, a quarter of a percent higher. and the standard & poor's in unchartered territory again. another all-time high if we closed here. a gain of just two points, nonetheless, unchartered territory. >> bob pisani is walking the floors. >> the way i've been explaining this. modest liquidity, restricted supply, increased demand nor stocks, because people are looking for dividends and you get a squee
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